May 29, 2014 at 1:00 am

Flint Eastwood throws a BBQ with a bevy of Michigan bands

Members of Flint Eastwood — Bryan Pope, center left, Jax Anderson and Mark Hartman — invited some of their friends for a BBQ at the Crowfoot on Saturday. (Elizabeth Conley / The Detroit News)

It’s backyard barbecue season, and Detroit rockers Flint Eastwood are getting in on the action.

The Detroit foursome is cinching up its bolo ties and hosting the first-ever, potentially first-annual Flint Family BBQ on Saturday at Pontiac’s Crofoot Ballroom.

The band doesn’t have an album to push, or any ulterior motives for throwing the party. It’s summer, the sun’s out, and Flint Eastwood wanted to throw a bash for friends and fans where everyone could get together and have fun.

“We’re the type of artists that we’re always thinking about things to do and different ways that we can bring it outside of just recording and just writing and just playing shows,” says Jax Anderson, the group’s lead singer.

The BBQ idea was hatched after the group’s sold-out show at Ferndale’s Loving Touch in January, when the group realized they had a greater pull than they first thought. Saturday’s event will feature free food, games such as cornhole and Giant Jenga, and live performances from nine acts from around the state on two stages.

“It’s been a gradual progression of more and more things,” says Anderson, who makes up Flint Eastwood along with guitarist Bryan Pope, drummer Mark Hartman and bassist Clay Carnill. “The best part of summer is just going in someone’s backyard and chillin’, drinking a beer and playing games with your friends.”

That’s the concept of the Flint Family BBQ, but on a bigger scale. The group enlisted artists such as Detroit rock group George Morris and the Gypsy Chorus, East Lansing rockers Joe Hertler and the Rainbow Seekers, Oxford sibling duo Carts Before Horses, Southfield folk-rocker Greater Alexander and more to join in on the fun.

“We kind of wanted to give Detroit fans an opportunity to see what’s happening around the state of Michigan,” Anderson says. “We wanted to get bands that aren’t getting much love in the Detroit scene, and everyone that we asked to play was super receptive and everyone’s excited about it.”

For Flint Eastwood, which formed in 2012 and has been building a strong fan base off the energy of its live sets, pulling together the show ups its profile within the Detroit music community. “This is a huge risk we’re taking. If people don’t show up, we’re going to be losing a lot of money and a lot of credibility,” she says. “But we have faith that the Detroit scene is there and that things will happen.”

The group is using the show as a way to say hello to a summer that will see them scale back on live performances and hunker down to begin work on a new album. The songs started coming together a month ago, Anderson says, and the band is working through demos and deciding if they want to work with a producer on the new set, which follows last year’s “Late Nights in Bolo Ties” EP, or do it themselves.

Anderson says the new songs will push the band in a different direction.

“For people who don’t like the sound we’re creating, maybe it’s not for them, and we’re OK with that,” she says. “But I’m super-super excited to get this stuff out, and I feel like it’s going to be something good.”

Flint Eastwood's Flint Family BBQ

with Flint Eastwood, George Morris

and the Gypsy Chorus, Joe Hertler and the

Rainbow Seekers, Monument Monument,

Rival Summers, Blaire Alise and the

Bombshells, DL Rossi, Carts Before Horses

and Greater Alexander

5 p.m. Saturday

Crofoot Ballroom, 1 S. Saginaw, Pontiac

Tickets $10 advance, $15 day of show

(248) 858-9333

Ticketweb.com

agraham@detroitnews.com
twitter.com/grahamorama

Blaire Alise of Blaire Alise and the Bombshells gets the fire going. (Elizabeth Conley / The Detroit News)
Oxford siblings Elizabeth, left, and Lauren Reisig make up participating ... (Elizabeth Conley / The Detroit News)
George Morris of George Morris and the Gypsy Chorus is bringing his band ... (Elizabeth Conley / The Detroit News)