May 30, 2014 at 1:00 am

Candice Tells All

Basement transitions from home office to home comfort

The homeowners wanted a functional space but also wanted it to be pure entertainment. The key was dividing the bowling alley-shaped room into different zones. (MCT)

Roslyn and David are busy people with some serious hobbies. Roslyn is an A-1 cook, and David is a dedicated do-it-yourselfer who knows his way around a toolbox.

Nine years ago, David started to renovate the basement ... and let’s just say it’s never been the same since! This long and narrow space needs to function as David’s home office and as entertainment central, but the DIY reno — although it got an “A” for effort — just didn’t cut it. This multifunctional room was crammed full of office supplies and personal mementos, and the space was crying out for an organizational cure.

We started from the top down, tearing out David’s botched drywall job and replacing it with a gorgeous, easy-to-install suspended panel ceiling system. It snaps into place in moments and looks like a million bucks, especially when we added new recessed lighting (the existing fixtures were shorting out)!

David and Roslyn wanted their basement to be functional, but they also wanted it to be pure entertainment. The key to achieving this dual purpose was dividing the bowling alley-shaped room into different zones. There’s the office zone, of course, that is hardworking and functional. Then there’s a sort of dividing line between work and pleasure, marked by a bar area that is complete with counter, bar stools and an elegant pendant light fixture. Finally, at the far end of the room there is a comfortable and welcoming lounge area.

David had previously removed an old wood stove from the basement, and they wanted to have a fireplace. We installed a new gas insert that is elevated and surrounded by a beautiful hammered stone veneer. It is visible from every corner of the room and serves as the focal point of this space, drawing the eye while conveying a warm invitation to relax after a busy day.

The lack of storage was a big problem in this basement. The solution was custom built-in cabinetry, which flanks the TV and fireplace. Plenty of shelving ensures there is room to display photos, travel souvenirs, and books.

Floor length drapes cover the basement’s small windows, creating the illusion of full windows beyond. A comfy armchair with a reading light helps the transition from lounge to office, and as we move toward the desk we find all kinds of storage solutions. Upper and lower cabinetry, filing drawers and shelving surround the spacious desk surface — and we even found room for a small bar fridge at the end of the counter!

David and Roslyn travel frequently, so they have a lot of luggage, which is kept in the large storage space adjacent to the basement family room. We installed an innovative sliding door to hide the storage room, with a useful pinboard surface. We displayed the couple’s travel photos here, but since it’s adjacent to the desk, David could also use it for work-related materials.

And speaking of travel photos, we even enlarged scenic pictures from David and Roslyn’s vacations and hung them beside the bar area, to help encourage that transition from work to play.

And, finally, one last thing to note is the flooring we chose to replace the laminate that David tried to install. We selected a grey engineered wood flooring system that contrasts nicely with the ceiling and walls. It’s also durable, and will resist any basement dampness.

After a nine-year wait, David and Roslyn finally have a professionally finished basement. Storage solutions abound, and everything has its place now. Our light and airy color palette makes the space seem much bigger, and with personal touches like travel photos and souvenirs, we’ve really made this space feel like home.

Interior decorator Candice Olson is host of HGTV’s “Candice Tells All.” For more, visit hgtv.com/candice-tells-all-full-episodes/videos.

An innovative sliding door — with a useful pinboard surface featuring ... (MCT)
Before, the basement was a long and narrow space. (MCT)
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