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Ferrari looks to burnish brand value ahead of IPO

Colleen Barry
Associated Press


Customers look at clothing at a Ferrari store in Milan, Italy, which already sells branded fashion items.<252><137>— 399-euro ($494) carbon frame Oakley sunglasses, 445-euro ($550) watches and a 1,250-euro ($1,546) LaFerrari lamb nappa leather jacket — not all products bearing the Formula 1 Scuderia logo are of the same high quality.People look at clothing in a Ferrari Store in Milan, Italy, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014. Ferrari’s sleek sports cars and souped-up Formula 1 racing machines have made the prancing horse logo among the world’s most powerful brands, and now the company is preparing for a public company listing and wants to cash in on its brand recognition as a luxury goods company. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)<252><137>

Milan — Ferrari's sleek sports cars and souped-up Formula 1 racing machines have made the prancing horse logo among the world's most powerful brands. Now, as the company prepares for a public listing, it wants to cash in on the cachet.

The aim: position Ferrari not just as a carmaker, but as a luxury goods company. Think Armani, Hermes … Ferrari.

Analysts say that could mean refining its line of merchandise or creating a chain of exclusive clubs and hotels catering to Ferrari owners and the wealthy.

Chairman Sergio Marchionne will present his vision to investors in the coming weeks, but the potential already has the two worlds spinning in anticipation.

The made-in-Italy luxury goods sector is abuzz over whether Marchionne's ambition could facilitate the creation of an alliance of high-end producers, one that might stand up to the French conglomerates like LVMH, while financial analysts are crunching numbers on the brand's potential value.

"I actually think cars are almost incidental to Ferrari," Marchionne said last month when announcing plans to spin off Ferrari from its mass-market parent Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV. "It sounds sacrilegious. But it is truly a luxury brand."

Persuading the investing community of that distinction could significantly multiply Ferrari's market value by putting it among a category of companies that squeeze value not just out of the quality of the materials and products, but also out of their allure.

A man looks through a window of a Ferrari store in Milan, Italy. The carmaker may expand its luxury product line beyond making autos.<252><137>A man watches outside a shop window of a Ferrari Store in Milan, Italy, Tuesday, Dec.9, 2014. Ferrari’s sleek sports cars and souped-up Formula 1 racing machines have made the prancing horse logo among the world’s most powerful brands. Now, as the company prepares for a public listing, it wants to cash in on the cachet. The aim: position Ferrari not just among its car-making peers, but as a luxury goods company. Think Armani, Hermes ... Ferrari. Analysts say that could mean refining its line of merchandise, expanding upon a theme park franchise or creating a chain of members’ clubs and hotels catering to the rich. Chairman Sergio Marchionne will present his vision to investors in the coming weeks, but the potential already has two worlds spinning in anticipation. (AP PhotoAP Photo/Luca Bruno)<137><137><252><137>

Currently, its revenue stream is limited by the fact that it keeps car sales to just 7,000 a year to retain an aura of exclusivity. Also, manufacturing high-performance engines and race cars is more capital intensive than, say, fashion.

Ferrari could gamble and expand its range of car offerings to include SUVs, a well-performing segment globally. That would bring its auto portfolio closer in line with competitors Porsche or Bentley. Lamborghini, another Italian sports car maker, has previewed a concept SUV.

Already the brand presents itself as a luxury producer, with such services as on-sight atelier for Ferrari buyers to customize their sports cars and a race track for Ferrari owner test drives.

But analysts say there is more the company can do to monetize that image. One strategy could be creating an exclusive Ferrari club that could eventually be expanded to hotels catering to Ferrari owners and very high net worth individuals, said Brand Finance executive Robert Haigh.

In addition, the Ferrari World theme park — which is being expanded from Abu Dhabi to Barcelona — could be taken global, capitalizing on Ferrari's reputation for cutting-edge technology, he said.

And while Ferrari is already selling branded fashion items — 399-euro ($494) carbon frame Oakley sunglasses, 445-euro ($550) watches and a 1,250-euro ($1,546) LaFerrari lamb nappa leather jacket — not all products bearing the Formula 1 Scuderia logo are of the same high quality.

"There are Ferrari caps, rubbish jackets and watches that are not necessarily expensive or well-made," Haigh said. "They are not necessarily protecting the Scuderia brand the way they should be."