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Los Angeles — The production version of the Chevrolet Bolt EV will be revealed in January during the 2016 CES show in Las Vegas, GM confirmed Thursday at the Los Angeles Auto Show.

The automaker revealed the Bolt concept, a hatchback with seating for five, in January at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. Later in the year, GM confirmed the car, with at least 200 miles of electric range, would go into production next year. With a starting price expected in the $30,000 range, the Bolt will be a direct competitor to the Tesla Model 3 as the auto companies compete to make an affordable electric car.

Auto experts say affordable, volume sales of electrics are key to building a national re-charging structure. Currently 80 percent of recharging is done in the home, and the electric market is limited to high-end luxury cars like Tesla’s Model S.

“The Bolt is a very important piece” of meeting California’s emissions mandates, GM product chief Mark Reuss said from the LA show.

California regulations require 15.4 percent of manufacturer’s vehicles sold in the state be zero-emission vehicles by 2025.

“It’s company-wide, so (the mandate) will be easier for us to meet as a full-line automaker with cars like the Chevy Volt, Spark EV, and Bolt,” Reuss said. GM also confirmed production of a plug-in version of its upcoming Cadillac CT6 sedan.

At CES, GM CEO, Mary Barra is slated as the keynote speaker on Jan. 6. Barra is expected to talk about how the automaker is redefining personal mobility. The trade show runs Jan. 6-9.

CES has had an increasing automotive presence over the past few years. This upcoming show is slated to feature 115 automotive technology companies, including nine automakers who will use 200,000 net square feet of floor space.

The Bolt will be built at GM’s Orion Assembly Plant in Orion Township beginning in late 2016. The plant is receiving a $160 million upgrade to support production of the electric vehicle.

The Chevy Bolt EV will be sold across the United States and in select global markets. GM aims to classify the vehicle as a crossover. The aim is for the price to be less than $30,000 with including a federal rebate.

Henry Payne is auto critic of The Detroit News and can be reached at hpayne@detroitnews.com.

Staff Writer Melissa Burden contributed.

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