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General Motors Co.'s soon-to-be-empty plants are still getting national attention after CEO Mary Barra spent two days in Washington this week.

Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Dearborn, and other officials from Michigan and Ohio are inviting President Donald Trump to visit the communities of all four affected plants in the U.S., including Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly, Warren Transmission and the Lordstown Assembly plant in northeast Ohio.

The invitation was led by Rep. Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio, and signed by Dingell; Rep.-elect Andy Levin, D-Bloomfield Township; Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio; and Rep. Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio.

GM CEO Mary Barra was in Washington this week meeting with members of Congress from Michigan and Ohio to discuss the automaker's plans for the affected plants.

"Respectfully, we invite you to join us to visit the Lordstown Assembly, Warren Transmission, Brownstown Battery, Baltimore Operations and Detroit-Hamtramck plants, to meet the workers who will soon receive pink slips," the officials wrote in a joint statement. "We urge your administration’s intervention in every manner possible to seek both short and long term remedies for these workers, the auto-part supplies that will also be impacted, and the communities sure to be severely impacted by these job losses."

In the private sector, Tesla Inc. CEO Elon Musk told Lesley Stahl of CBS's "60 Minutes" that it's "possible we would be interested" in one of GM's soon-to-be-empty plants "if (GM) were to sell a plant or not use it." The segment will air Sunday.

GM announced late last month that it would "unallocate" five North American plants, including Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly and Warren Transmission, imperiling the jobs of 6,300 hourly workers at the same time it slashes some 8,000 white-collar positions.

The Detroit automaker's plants, which will stop all production by the end of next year, are not up for sale or officially closing at this point.

GM CEO Mary Barra was in Washington this week meeting with members of Congress from Michigan and Ohio to discuss the automaker's plans for the affected plants.

Musk's interest in using GM's plants comes after Volkswagen AG CEO Herbert Diess said the German automaker "might use Ford capacity here in the U.S. to build cars" while in Washington earlier this week and as FCA plans to revive a long-idled engine plant in Detroit as a Jeep assembly plant

Tesla, which has aspirations of selling in Europe and China in the coming years, makes the all-electric Model S, Model X and Model 3 at its only auto plant in California. Tesla bought its Fremont plant from a joint venture operated by GM and Toyota Motor Corp.

Bloomberg contributed to this report

nnaughton@detroitnews.com

Twitter: @NoraNaughton

 

 

 

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