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Detroit — Developments are underway for the Core City neighborhood on Detroit's west side.

The Detroit-based Prince Concepts real estate company, which developed Detroit's Takoi restaurant and the True North mixed-use project, announced plans Wednesday for a 50,000-square-foot development near Grand River and Warren. 

The phase Prince Concepts is introducing is estimated to cost $2.5 million and has already started, said founder Philip Kafka. 

"We chose this neighborhood because it's the best in Detroit," Kafka said. "It has interesting landscapes and all the elements of Detroit with industrial in railroads and residential neighborhoods."

 

The development is 3½ miles northwest of downtown and will include coffee shops, restaurants, bars, rental housing, creative offices and outdoor public spaces. The project aims to increase walkability and livability of the Core City neighborhood and improve the borders it shares with the Woodbridge and Northwest Goldberg neighborhoods.

Plans include: 

  • The Sawtooth — A mixed-use hub at 4884 Grand River, it will house new commercial spaces: Astro Coffee will expand early this summer from its Corktown storefront to a 3,500-square-foot space inside The Sawtooth with an Et Al-designed roasting facility, Ochre Bakery and retail space; the Lafayette American advertising agency; and a commissary kitchen. They will join Prince Concepts offices, Underdog Boxing and an artisanal jewelry company.
  • 5K — Formerly a grocery store, the 12,000-square-foot 1950s building will be turned into eight gallery-style apartments with ground-level retail. The building will share a winter garden and courtyard with the neighborhood. 
  • Magnet — Takoi Chef Brad Greenhill is embarking on a new 2,100-square-foot restaurant and bar called Magnet. The menu will be vegetable-centric.
  • The Caterpillar — Live-and-work rental units will give each tenant 1,300-1,900 square feet. The project is in the early design phases involving Undecorated, Stamberg Aferiat + Associates and Studio Detroit.

”We want energy," Kafka said. "We want the neighborhood to respect the past, but also look to the future.”

srahal@detroitnews.com

 

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