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The newest concept inside the Fort Street Galley food hall is Which Came First, a chicken and egg sandwich concept from chef Phil Milton. 

Here, Milton is blending two hot trends: fried chicken and build-your-own meal. Guests choose between chicken (breast or thigh, grilled or fried), egg (scrambled or fried) or hand-breaded chicken tenders. Decide on a "nest": potato bun, wrap, salad or gluten-free bun. 

Next, choose how you want your sandwich or salad dressed. There are Cuban, Italian, Asian and Nashville styles, plus the "Bae," which is your choice of chicken or eggs with applewood smoked bacon, avocado, a "dippy" egg and sharp cheddar cheese. 

Sandwiches run $12-$13 and sides such as deviled eggs, four-cheese mac, fries and onion rings run $4-$6. The very hearty poutine with Nashville hot chicken, crinkle-cut fries, cheese sauce, pickles, fried cheese curds and a fried egg is $12. 

The Nashville style is the go-to and it packs real heat. Along with your choice of chicken, the sandwich is loaded with hot sauce, house-made pickles, vinegar slaw and a spicy remoulade. 

Those with aversion to hot foods may want to try the General, which is a sweet Asian style sandwich with General Tso's sauce, mandarin slaw, wontons for a crunch and kewpie mayo. 

Chef Milton is no stranger to the Galley Group's structure. There is a Which Came First at the Federal Galley in Pittsburgh and Milton is also the chef behind Table, a classic American cuisine stall that opened in Fort Street Galley last spring. A similar concept of his, Home, is in the Smallman Galley, also in Pittsburgh. 

He said the idea for Which Came First, which he hopes becomes a franchise, started with the popularity of the chicken sandwich at Home. He blended the popularity of fast-casual, build-your-own meal places like Chipotle with today's current fried chicken fever to create the new concept. 

"It's very, very unique," he said, specifically of the fried chicken. "We pickle brine it ... and then the dredge on it is made with rice flour, potato starch and we fly in this stuff called 'crisp film,' which is a modified starch that Grant Achatz is using at (popular Chicago restaurant) Alinea. We were eating there and asked him, 'what is this?'" 

"It really doesn't compare to anything," said Milton, who is a Lansing native but is based in Pittsburgh. He says he's in Detroit every week. 

Open now with soft service until the grand opening Friday, Which Came First replaces the outgoing Lucky's Noble BBQ. a healthful barbecue brand from James Beard Award-winning chef Jimmy Schmidt. 

Filipino cuisine Isla is the last of the four original food stalls inside Fort Street Galley from it's opening late last year. Chef J.P. Garcia said they're still working toward their goal of opening an independent brick and mortar restaurant. 

Michigan & Trumbull, a Detroit-style pizza restaurant, is operating inside Fort Street Galley while they ready their Corktown location. Co-owner Kristen Calverley said they're still waiting on a liquor license, but hope to be open before the end of 2019. 

Fort Street Galley, 160 W. Fort in Detroit, is open for lunch and dinner daily, including brunch on Saturdays and Sunday. It has four food concepts and a full bar. Call (313) 230-0855 or visit fortstreetgalley.org. 

More: Chef Jimmy Schmidt's Lucky's Noble BBQ to move on from Fort Street Galley

More: Fans choose sides in the ‘Chicken Sandwich War’ of our time

mbaetens@detroitnews.com

Twitter: @melodybaetens

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