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Review: Throw up your devil's horns for 'Rock Camp: The Movie'

Documentary looks at the fan experience inside Rock and Roll Fantasy Camp

Adam Graham
Detroit News Film Critic

Everyone wants — or at some point has wanted — to be a rock star. 

Not everyone can do it; for one, it takes an exceptional head of hair. But at Rock Camp, you can pretend like you're one, even if only for a weekend.

Judas Priest's Rob Halford, third from left, in "Rock Camp."

"Rock Camp: The Movie" details the fan experience at Rock and Roll Fantasy Camp, which has been allowing accountants, lawyers, doctors and stay-at-home moms to live out their on-stage dreams for 20 years. 

These would-be rockers spend several days with other weekend warriors — along with real-life rock stars — hanging out, rocking out and performing together. Imagine shooting hoops with your favorite basketball player or taking batting practice with a former All-Star pitcher. That's what Rock Camp is for rock fans. 

Among the stars who have participated in Rock Camp are Alice Cooper, Sammy Hagar, Roger Daltry and Tommy Lee; lesser knowns from the ranks of Cinderella or Quiet Riot might be your camp counselor for the week. The spirit of rock and roll works its magic on everyone involved: fans are energized getting to hang with their faves, and the pros are reminded of the fans they once were and why they do it all in the first place. Everyone wins, and everyone rocks.

Rock Camp was founded by David Fishof, a former agent who hit it big putting together tours for the Monkees and Ringo Starr. Fishof is a colorful character and good time guy who got to live out his own rock and roll dreams by proxy, which is what allowed him to dream up the Rock Camp experience.  

The financials of all of this — both what it costs for camp (a few thousand dollars, judging by online searches) and what Fishof pays Paul Stanley to drop by — are left out of the mix, so the doc often feels like an infomercial for the camp more than an exposé. But if all you want to do is rock, "Rock Camp: The Movie" salutes you. 

agraham@detroitnews.com

@grahamorama

'Rock Camp: The Movie'

GRADE: B

Not rated: language

Running time: 88 minutes

Available via Cinema Detroit's Virtual Cinema