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'Rehab Addict' Nicole Curtis hits big milestone, films new HGTV show

Maureen Feighan
The Detroit News

Saturday marks a big milestone for Lake Orion native and HGTV star Nicole Curtis.

It’s the 10th anniversary of her hit show, “Rehab Addict.” Since 2009, the show, which has aired on both HGTV and the DIY network, has tracked Curtis -- an unabashed fan of old houses, old people and old dogs – rehabbing old homes in Detroit and Minneapolis.

Nicole Curtis, star of HGTV's "Rehab Addict," restored her first Detroit house in 2013.

Now, a decade after her big break, Curtis is gearing up for a new show on HGTV called “Rehab Addict Rescue." Set to debut in January, it will feature Curtis working with families across the country to "rescue" older homes that need help.

"Nicole is a proven talent whose personal passion for older homes and renovation expertise have inspired millions of rehab enthusiasts who, like her, embrace the unique challenges and opportunities that come with renovating a classic, vintage home," said Jane Latman, HGTV's president in a press release in July. "If you’re in over your head on a home restoration project, it's time for Rehab Addict Rescue."

Currently filming, the show will run for one-hour episodes, unlike "Rehab Addict," which runs for 30 minutes.

In November of 2015, people filed in to see the newly restored Ransom Gillis mansion in Brush Park. Curtis worked to restore the mansion with Quicken Loans and Bedrock.

Curtis, a self-taught rehabber and former real estate agent, rehabbed her first house in Detroit in 2013, a 2,000-square-foot duplex west of Corktown that had been damaged by fire. Later, she restored another on East Grand Boulevard and worked with Bedrock to restore the famed Ransom Gillis mansion in Detroit's historic Brush Park neighborhood.

On her new show, which will run for six episodes, Curtis and her team will work alongside clients to overhaul spaces that don’t meet their modern-day needs but still retaining the properties’ history and charm.