The full-service nail salon will open Friday and offer pedicures and manicures as well as wine and Champagne

LINKEDINCOMMENTMORE

Detroit resident Jordan Mann used to drive to the suburbs to get her nails done or scout out salons in Dearborn, where she works. But this week, the 26-year-old public relations professional will only have to walk around the corner from her downtown apartment to get her nails painted her go-to red and pink shades.

Opening at 10 a.m. Friday, owners of The TEN Nail Bar say they hope to fill the nail needs of Detroit residents and workers inconvenienced by the scarcity of nail salons downtown. At 1215 Griswold in Capitol Park, the modern nail salon will be open seven days a week and offer manicures, pedicures and complimentary beverages, such as coffee, tea, wine and Champagne — to play on the “nail bar” theme.

“We really want to bring an elevated experience to what’s considered a routine beauty treatment,” says co-owner Kelli Coleman, 31, who’s launching the business with her partner Anika Jackson, also 31.

They want to “fill the void” of nail services downtown, Coleman says.

“I’m definitely excited,” Mann says. “I was frustrated at the lack of options. As we are seeing more young professionals working and living downtown, it’s something that will be really appreciated.”

The TEN’s hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Prices range from $15 for a manicure to $40 for a pedicure. A mani-pedi combo is $55. A monthly TENure membership for $100 comes with two manicures and two deluxe pedicures per month. Appointments can be booked via phone or the TEN Nail Bar app, available on iTunes or Google Play.

Instead of individual nail stations, the salon has one long white table, or “nail bar,” seating eight technicians who will manicure every nail “to perfection,” Coleman says. Under Banksy prints, six cushioned pedicure stations (which function as mani stations for simultaneous polishing) face a wide-screen TV that will feature movies and entertainment events like New York Fashion Week. While waiting for nails to dry, guests can sip on beverages at a bar in the back.

“We want this to be a home away from home,” says Coleman, positioning on the bar a custom-scented TEN candle she created with Eastern Market-based DetroitWick. (They’re available for purchase at $20-$40.)

Coleman, a Birmingham resident, was previously a vice president for GlobalHue, a multicultural advertising agency founded by her father, former NFL linebacker Donald Coleman in Southfield and later expanded to New York.

Jackson, of Detroit, has an operations and real estate background. She returned to Michigan in 2014 to become president of Jackson Land Holding, a real estate arm of her father’s company, Jackson Asset Management.

The women have been friends since they attended Spelman College in Atlanta.

“We both have an entrepreneurial zest; it’s been the perfect partnership,” Coleman says.

They also come to Detroit with an outsider’s perspective, having frequented bustling nail salons in other cities they’ve lived — Coleman in New York City, and Jackson in Chicago. They wanted to provide a unique service in the city.

“It was important to us to bring what we saw as an amazing proven concept to the city of Detroit and fill an obvious void while contributing to the redevelopment of the city,” Coleman says.

The TEN, on the ground floor of the Malcomson Building, is a 1,200-square-foot space owned by Bedrock Real Estate Services. Dan Mullen, Bedrock’s executive vice president, says the company leased the space to the women because Bedrock executives “fell in love with their concept” and are well aware downtown workers, residents and visitors want nail services.

“I can’t tell you how many times people are requesting pedicures and manicures,” he says, adding that the requests primarily come from women.

While Bedrock has a few beauty services in its portfolio, like Salon Detroit on Woodward (which offers manicures for $25 and pedicures for $45), The TEN is the company’s first nail salon. Mullen says Bedrock supported the idea of the nail bar because Coleman and Jackson are “looking to create a different experience.”

“That’s our vision as well: How can we do things that are different? What else can we add to a normal retailer?” he says. “And they hit a home run with all the above.”

Ken Harris, president and CEO of the Michigan Black Chamber of Commerce, says the salon demonstrates that a growing number of African-American women see Detroit as a place to start or expand a business. For instance, in July, Roslyn Karamoko opened Detroit is the New Black clothing store. Across the street on Woodward, Regina Gaines opened House of Pure Vin, a wine shop, in December. The Lip Bar founder Melissa Butler also moved her lipstick collection’s headquarters to Detroit in 2014.

“There are more than 41,000 African-American businesses within the city of Detroit,” Harris says. “African-American women are a significant portion of those new startups or businesses building capacity and creating new jobs.”

Coleman says she sees The TEN as an enterprise and wants to eventually expand.

“We’re hoping there will be a great response, and we’ll have the ability to open other locations,” she says.

Already, the salon has a social media following, with about 500 followers on Instagram (@theTENdetroit) and is spreading awareness with the hashtag #Perfect10.

“We’re hoping to attract people who work, as well as live in the area,” Coleman says, “but we think this will also be a destination, even for people who live outside of the downtown area.”

Even the men are excited. While Harris admits he doesn’t regularly get manicures, the women in his life will be thrilled.

“I do have sisters and a girlfriend who loves to get her nails done,” he says.

As for Mullen, he’s never had his nails done.

“Now that they’re offering beverages,” he says, “I might have to start.”

ssteinberg@detroitnews.com

(313) 222-2156

Twitter: @Steph_Steinberg

The TEN Nail Bar

1215 Griswold, Detroit

Grand opening Friday.

10 a.m.-8 p.m. Mondays-Fridays; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays

(313) 315-3010

thetendetroit.com

LINKEDINCOMMENTMORE
Read or Share this story: http://detne.ws/2czrnw1