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Local designer unveils line of salvaged wood, metal tables

Local furniture designer Laura Scaccia has teamed up with Architectural Salvage Warehouse of Detroit to create a series of tables made from wood and metal salvaged from old Detroit homes. Scaccia's business Eclecticasa last weekend introduced a new collection of tables called the Detroit Collection. Using wood from deconstructed homes, each piece — including coffee, console, end and accent tables — is an "incredible blend of workmanship, unique design and preservation," says Scaccia. Each top is paired with industrial or antique iron legs and stamped with the address of where the wood was salvaged. "I love what they (Architectural Salvage Warehouse of Detroit) do because it keeps this stuff out of our landfills!" Scaccia says. Scaccia recently unveiled the new collection at the Designer Craftsmen & Historic Home Show in Valley Forge, Penn. For more information, call (248) 631-5605 or visit eclecticasa.com.

Freshen your home's

air with houseplants

Can you feel it? I can. It's the mid-winter itch. You're really — I mean really — ready to be done with winter and all the cold and slushiness, but the calendar says spring is still more than four weeks away. If the air at home is feeling especially stuffy as winter drags on, English Gardens' experts have issued a list of the Top 10 houseplants to brighten up your space. And house plants do more than look pretty; they purify the air. Adding just one 8- or 10-inch plant for every 100 square feet can help clean the air, add humidity and boost your mood, according to English Gardens. The top 10 are:

Areca palm: Also known as yellow palm or butterfly palm; consistently rated one of the best plants for removing indoor air toxins. Best in direct, bright sunlight.

Bamboo Palm: Tropical palm that pumps much-needed moisture into the indoor atmosphere; best in direct, bright sunlight.

Chinese Evergreen: (Aglaonema): Easy-to-care-for with beautiful variegated foliage. Great for places with low light and bright, indirect sunlight.

Dracaena "Janet Craig": Attractive plant with dark-green leaves; very tolerant of neglect and low light.

Ficus Alii: An attractive plant with dark, slender leaves, it is an excellent choice for the home or office; best in direct, bright sunlight to indirect, medium sunlight.

Heart-Shaped Philodendron: A vine with heart-shaped leaves, this type of Philodendron is low maintenance and likes to dry out between waterings. Best in indirect sunlight.

Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum): Outstanding green foliage with elegant white spathes; I can attest that this plant is resilient! Best in indirect, medium to low sunlight.

Pothos: Popular plant for low light, low humidity and cooler temperature conditions, Pothos comes in a variety of foliage types. Allow soil to dry out between waterings.

Snake Plant (Sansevieria): An exotic plant perfect for low light and humid conditions; great for the bathroom because they filter out formaldehyde.

Spider Plant: A great choice for neglectful gardeners; rich foliage and tiny white flowers. Best in bright indirect sunlight.

Better Homes & Gardens releases warm, bold 2015 color palette

Better Homes & Gardens named its second annual Color Palette of the Year this week and it includes warm, bold shades such as Fresh Berry and Rainforest Green to more muted colors such as Sophisticated Gray (stay tuned for next week's cover story which is all about the real 50 shades of gray). Better Homes and Gardens editors scouted trend forecasts, runway shows, trade show booths to develop this year's palette; they also spoke with color experts at the Color Marketing Group's International Summit. They then narrowed done tones to offer hues that are "modern, lasting, and most importantly, livable," according to a news release. ""For 2015, our approach is all about optimism and a fresh outlook – adding vibrant pops of color in places where you might least expect them," Gayle Butler, Better Homes and Gardens' editor-in-chief. The magazine's March Color issue hits newstands on Tuesday.

Alternatives

to roses for Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day is Saturday and if you plan to buy flowers for your special someone, who says it has to be roses? Ferndale-based Blumz by JRDesigns says 61 percent of people will receive roses, but there are other options. Blumz makes an arrangement called Zen Artistry that has purple dendrobium orchids, green carnations, dark pink Sweet William, an emerald palm leaf and other tropical greens. Other options for Valentine's Day: Chrysanthemums, tulips, orchids and calla lillies.

Cranbrook House and Gardens seeks docents

Interested in becoming a docent for Cranbrook House and Gardens? Now is your chance. Cranbrook House and Gardens Auxiliary, the volunteer group responsible for maintaining Cranbrook House and Gardens, is offering docent training for Cranbrook House on Tuesdays, March 3 through April 28, from 6-8 p.m. Cranbrook House, on Lone Pine Road in Bloomfield Hills, was designed in 1908 by renowned architect Albert Kahn for newspaper mogul George Booth and his wife, Ellen Scripps. It's Metro Detroit's oldest manor house. No experience is needed to become a docent. To learn more or register, call (248) 645-3149, email houseandgardens@cranbrook.edu or visit http://housegardens.cranbrook.edu.

Jamie Drake introduces collection at Shuptrine

Renowned New York designer Jamie Drake, who has decorated homes for everyone from Madonna to former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, is known for his bold use of color. So known, in fact, if he presents designs to clients that don't go big and bold, "I've had clients say, 'We were hoping for a bit more color,'" says Drake. Still, for those a little more hesitant, Drake says "start small but decisively." "Maybe reconsider smaller items and accessories — change your throw pillows, lamps, lamp bases or upholster a side chair or ottoman," he says. Drake will be at Scott Shuptrine Interiors in Royal Oak from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday to introduce his Jamie Drake for Theodore Alexander collection, now available at Scott Shuptrine. Introduced at last spring's High Point market, the sophisticated, sculptural collection of tables and case goods features a lot of brass, bronze and lacquer finishes. It was inspired by European design, "especially French design from the 1940s, '60s, '70s," says Drake. When it comes to using sculptural pieces, Drake suggests using other pieces that are more linear and straightforward. To attend the Feb. 25 free event, go to scottshuptrine.eventbrite.com.

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