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Detroit Artifactry opens in Corktown

Gail Kaye had a fast-paced career in finance and her husband John was in advertising when they decided to step away from it all and pursue what they really love: collecting. But they needed somewhere to sell all their treasures. The result is an eclectic new home decor store in Corktown called Detroit Artifactry. Opened quietly on Michigan Avenue in October, this 2,000-square-foot store features a quirky mix of home accents, old signs, and antique furniture (I loved the ceramic phrenology heads). “We’re collectors,” says Kaye, whose son Dave Kwiatkowski owns popular cocktail bar the Sugar House and restaurant Wright & Co. The store is as fun to visit for the decor – there’s an industrial vibe and roll-down door – as it is to shop. Located 2135 Michigan Avenue, it’s open 12-7 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday; 12-8 p.m. Friday and Saturday; and 12-6 p.m. Sunday.

‘Music in Homes’ concert series kicks off

Detroit’s Palmer Woods kicks off the ninth season of “Music in Homes” concert series with a sold-out concert Saturday with the James Carter Quartet. The new season will include eight concerts, featuring a range of genres, including jazz, world music, and Afro-Cuban. Each concert is held in a different Palmer Woods home. The 2015-16 season includes: Mardi Gras with Taslimah Bey Ragtime Band on Jan. 30; a Black History Jazz concert on Feb. 20; the Victor Ghannam World Music Quartet on March 19. The season will end with a special music performance by comedian and Detroit native David Alan Grier, who will perform with the David Alan Grier Quartet on June 18. Go to palmerwoods.org/music-in-homes or call (313) 891-2514.

New Christmas book features Edsel & Eleanor Ford House

Historic homes take on a special glow during the holidays. Decked out in their holiday finery, they shimmer and sparkle, all while taking us back to a different time. Now, the Edsel & Eleanor House in Grosse Pointe Shores is featured in a new book, “Christmas at America’s Landmark Houses” (Schiffer Publishing, $45). This glossy 255-page book includes a brief history of the 1920s home built for Henry Ford’s only son, Edsel, his wife, Eleanor, and their four kids. It also features exterior and interior photos of the house at the holidays, including pictures of the tall tree in the main hallway with Eleanor’s custom teardrop-shaped ornaments. “Christmas at America’s Landmark Houses” features 19 historic homes across the country.

Create a table oozing with Christmas spirit

You’ve planned every aspect of Christmas dinner, from cocktails to dessert. Then it hits you: you also need to decorate the table. Don’t panic. Below are some easy and quick ideas for creating a table oozing with Christmas spirit:

■Add some sparkle. Use ornaments in the center of your table to give your table some bling. Use colors that replicate your tree to tie them together.

■Go white. White is timeless and serene. Going with an all white-palette will create an air of calmness.

■Add plaid. Plaid seems to be everywhere this year. Use a plaid table runner, place mats, or cloth napkins to give your table a festive feel.

■Greenery and berries. Create a simple and lovely table arrangement with red berry branches from your yard. Surround it with some evergreen branches and pine cones.

■Cool cranberries. Who says cranberries are just for eating? Take a Mason jar and add water and a floating candle. Throw in some cranberries and holly branches for color.

Stressed out? Try a coloring book

Frazzled? Fried? Need to decompress from holiday madness? How about coloring a picture? Coloring books aren’t just for kids anymore. Visit any Barnes & Noble these days and you’ll see rows and rows of adult coloring books. Experts say it’s soothing and relaxing for adults to color. Karen Larson is a Lathrup Village graphic designer who has published two coloring books and an array of color-your-own photo cards. Larson’s Color My World coloring books are filled with her illustrations inspired by nature, animals and other elements. Coloring is “addictive, it’s meditative, it’s relaxing,” she says. It’s “getting away from electronics and doing something with your hands and making creative decisions.” When it comes to coloring, Larson says stick with colored pencils. “Colored pencils, markers, gel pens — even watercolor — they all work due to the heavy weight of the paper stock,” writes Larson on her website, coloringbook.design. “I also recommend using metallic gel pens, to add a little ‘bling’ to your artwork.”

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