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As the world awaits the latest royal baby to be born to Prince Harry and American Meghan Markle -- now Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex --  a quick scan of any newsstand in the U.S. and Great Britain is enough to prove that royal watching remains a popular pastime.

Linda Tucker inherited a small – approximately 3 ¾-inches by 3 ¼ -- porcelain mug that commemorated Queen Victoria’s 1897 diamond jubilee from her grandparents. “Every school child got one of these,” she told appraiser Brian Thomczek at a recent appraisal held at the Michigan Design Center in Troy.

The design includes a crest with a lion and a unicorn and a variety of words in French. It says “Made in Germany” on the bottom, something Thomczek said “was probably Albert’s influence, since he was German.”

While reproductions are common, the provenance and apparent age led the appraiser to surmise that the piece was indeed antique (which, technically, is defined as (which, technically, is defined as anything at least a century old). “Judging by the thinness of the handle and the look of the materials, I’m pretty sure this is legit,” Thomczek told Tucker.

Unfortunately, the years have left their mark. “There are some minor condition issues, including a small chip on the bottom and cracking in the glaze. That said, the design is nicely done and there are always people interested in royal collectibles. It’s ironic that this is the British coat of arms but the words are in French,” he added, translating the words to mean “God and My Right,” something he attributed to Henry V. He also explained that the unicorn represented Ireland and Scotland.

Tucker wondered if the small size was because it was given to children, something Thomczek said made sense. “Unfortunately, the crack and condition hurts it, “he pointed out. “In perfect shape, I’d value it at $90, but as is, just $35.”

An internet search showed that there’s a wide range of royal items available, including hundreds of styles of commemorative china. If you’re looking to start a collection, the British online auction site Catawiki (catawiki.com) has a handy guide to which commemorative royal pieces to invest in -- and which not to.

“If you're searching for real investment potential - look for personal objects, pieces that were actually touched or used by royal family members, such as autographs, letters, pieces of clothing or historical objects,” the site reads. “Pieces used by popular royals such as Diana, William and Kate are of particular interest. The dress that Kate Middleton was wearing when William saw her for the first time sold for around €89,700 in 2011. The bicycle that Lady Diana was forced to stop riding by the royal officials before her wedding to Prince Charles was auctioned in February 2018 for €10,400. And some particularly remarkable sales were Queen Victoria's bloomers, sold in 2011 for almost €11,000, and Queen Elizabeth’s underwear sold at auction for almost €12,000 in 2012.”

Do you have an object you would like to know more about? Send a photo and description that includes how you acquired the object to: The Detroit News, Trash or Treasure?, 160 W. Fort St., Detroit, MI 48226. Include your name and daytime telephone number. You may also send your photo and description to trashortreas@aol.com. If chosen you’ll need to bring the items to an appraisal session. Letters are edited for style and clarity. Photos cannot be returned.

                                                

About this item

Item: British commemorative mug

Appraised by: Brian Thomczek

Owned by: Linda Tucker

Estimated value:  $35 and up

 

                                                

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Royal Watching Still Popular Pastime

11-23

Jodi: This is from the July appraisal at the Michigan Design Center. FYI

 

 By Khristi Zimmeth

Special to the Detroit News

As the world awaits the latest royal baby to be born to Prince Harry and American Megan Markle, a quick scan of any newsstand in the U.S. and Great Britain is enough to prove that royal watching remains a popular pastime.

Linda Tucker inherited a small – approximately 3 ¾-inches by 3 ¼ -- porcelain mug that commemorated Queen Victoria’s diamond jubilee from her grandparents. “Every school child got one of these,” she told appraiser Brian Thomczek at a recent appraisal held at The Michigan Design Center in Troy.

The design includes a crest with a Lion and a unicorn and a variety of words in French. It says “Made in Germany” on the bottom, something Thomczek said “was probably Albert’s influence, since he was German.”

While reproductions are common, the provenance and apparent age led the appraiser to surmise that the piece was indeed antique (which, technically, is defined as anything over a century old). “Judging by the thinness of the handle and the look of the materials, I’m pretty sure this is legit,” Thomczek told Tucker.

Unfortunately, the years have left their mark. “There are some minor condition issues, including a small chip on the bottom and cracking in the glaze. That said, the design is nicely done and there are always people interested in royal collectibles. It’s ironic that this is the British coat of arms but the words are in French,” he added, translating the words to mean “God and My Right,” something he attributed to Henry V. He also explained that the unicorn represented Ireland and Scotland.

Tucker wondered if the small size was because it was given to children, something Thomczek said made sense. “Unfortunately, the crack and condition hurts it, “he pointed out. “In perfect shaper, I’d value it at $90, but as is, just $35.”

An internet search showed that there’s a wide range of royal items available, including hundreds of styles of commemorative china. If you’re looking to start a collection, the British auction site Catawiki (catawiki.com) has a handy guide to which commemorative royal pieces to invest in -- and which not to.

“If you're searching for real investment potential - look for personal objects, pieces that were actually touched or used by royal family members, such as autographs, letters, pieces of clothing or historical objects,” the site reads. “Pieces used by popular royals such as Diana, William and Kate are of particular interest. The dress that Kate Middleton was wearing when William saw her for the first time sold for around €89,700 in 2011. The bicycle that Lady Diana was forced to stop riding by the royal officials before her wedding to Prince Charles was auctioned in February 2018 for €10,400. And some particularly remarkable sales were Queen Victoria's bloomers, sold in 2011 for almost €11,000, and Queen Elizabeth’s underwear sold at auction for almost €12,000 in 2012.”

Item: British commemorative mug

Appraised by: Brian Thomczek

Owned by: Linda Tucker

Estimated value:  $35 and up

 

                                                

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Royal Watching Still Popular Pastime

11-23

Jodi: This is from the July appraisal at the Michigan Design Center. FYI

 

 By Khristi Zimmeth

Special to the Detroit News

As the world awaits the latest royal baby to be born to Prince Harry and American Megan Markle, a quick scan of any newsstand in the U.S. and Great Britain is enough to prove that royal watching remains a popular pastime.

Linda Tucker inherited a small – approximately 3 ¾-inches by 3 ¼ -- porcelain mug that commemorated Queen Victoria’s diamond jubilee from her grandparents. “Every school child got one of these,” she told appraiser Brian Thomczek at a recent appraisal held at The Michigan Design Center in Troy.

The design includes a crest with a Lion and a unicorn and a variety of words in French. It says “Made in Germany” on the bottom, something Thomczek said “was probably Albert’s influence, since he was German.”

While reproductions are common, the provenance and apparent age led the appraiser to surmise that the piece was indeed antique (which, technically, is defined as anything over a century old). “Judging by the thinness of the handle and the look of the materials, I’m pretty sure this is legit,” Thomczek told Tucker.

Unfortunately, the years have left their mark. “There are some minor condition issues, including a small chip on the bottom and cracking in the glaze. That said, the design is nicely done and there are always people interested in royal collectibles. It’s ironic that this is the British coat of arms but the words are in French,” he added, translating the words to mean “God and My Right,” something he attributed to Henry V. He also explained that the unicorn represented Ireland and Scotland.

Tucker wondered if the small size was because it was given to children, something Thomczek said made sense. “Unfortunately, the crack and condition hurts it, “he pointed out. “In perfect shaper, I’d value it at $90, but as is, just $35.”

An internet search showed that there’s a wide range of royal items available, including hundreds of styles of commemorative china. If you’re looking to start a collection, the British auction site Catawiki (catawiki.com) has a handy guide to which commemorative royal pieces to invest in -- and which not to.

“If you're searching for real investment potential - look for personal objects, pieces that were actually touched or used by royal family members, such as autographs, letters, pieces of clothing or historical objects,” the site reads. “Pieces used by popular royals such as Diana, William and Kate are of particular interest. The dress that Kate Middleton was wearing when William saw her for the first time sold for around €89,700 in 2011. The bicycle that Lady Diana was forced to stop riding by the royal officials before her wedding to Prince Charles was auctioned in February 2018 for €10,400. And some particularly remarkable sales were Queen Victoria's bloomers, sold in 2011 for almost €11,000, and Queen Elizabeth’s underwear sold at auction for almost €12,000 in 2012.”

Item: British commemorative mug

Appraised by: Brian Thomczek

Owned by: Linda Tucker

Estimated value:  $35 and up

 

                                                

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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