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Detroit — Repair crews from the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department are on the scene of a water main break at Livernois and Grand River on the city's west side.

According to DWSD spokesman Gregory Eno, the break occurred at about 10 a.m. Wednesday.

"We will have to do an emergency shutdown on a 16-inch main to gain control of the flooding," Eno said."There are about five small businesses in that area, but none of them require water except for their lavatories."

The deepest water is pooled south of Grand River on Livernois, beside a McDonald's and a gas station.

The McDonald's on Livernois just south of Grand River is fully operational early Wednesday afternoon after waters initially flooded the drive-thru lanes for about two hours, shift manager Sade Gaston said.

"It happened real quick. It was coming in from Livernois like waves," Gaston said. "The crew went out and drained the water and I think they cleared up that main drain on Livernois."

Gaston said the drive-thru remained opened despite the flooding.

"Customers either tried to make their way through the water or they came inside," she said.

General manager Issack Ali said the restaurant would have to close if water is shut off to repair the break.

Without water, employees couldn't wash their hands or serve drinks and customers would not have access to restrooms, he said.

"We are fully operational as of right now and the city hasn't told us anything," he said. "So we are crossing our fingers."

The convenience store at a Shell gas station across Livernois from McDonalds remained open while flooding in the parking lot halted gasoline sales.

"No one can get gas right now because the water is too high," employee Sharmise Franklin said. "Cars have stopped and had to be pushed out."

Water to the building was shut off shortly before 1:30 p.m., forcing the Subway sub shop to close as well.

Business has been "drastically" affected by the break, Franklin said.

"No one can get gas, we haven't sold any gas since this happened," she said.

Potential customers going elsewhere to find fuel has caused lower sales on convenience store products and at Subway, she said.

The flooding initially reached the door to the building before receding slightly, Franklin said.

"It happened all the sudden, just flowing severely," she said.

TGreenwood@detroitnews.com

(313) 222-2023

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