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Metro Detroit, get ready for a summer that's a little warmer and drier than normal.

That's the outlook expected for June, July and August throughout southeast Michigan, according to the National Weather Service.

Although temperatures will be warmer, extreme heat isn't likely. In fact, the number of 90 degree days is expected to be below normal. Metro Detroit averages 11 days of scorching temperatures in the 90s each summer, with the first usually occurring in mid-June.

"One thing that can contribute to very hot temperatures during the summer sometimes is the fact that a lot of the heat comes from areas in the southern plains that have seen cooler than normal and wetter than normal conditions (this year)," said Dan Thompson, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in White Lake Township. "Our source region is a little cooler so we're less likely to see extreme heat this summer."

There will be an increase in humidity with some relief from the north.

"In May it's been fairly humid," Thompson said, "but after several days of humid weather (throughout the summer) we'll get a cold front to dry things out, cool things down."

"That's what we're anticipating for the rest of the summer."

As for rain, thunderstorm activity is hard to predict in advance for warm season months, according to the outlook.

"Southeast Michigan has seen frequent opportunities for rainfall as remnants of activity over the Plains lifts northeast, but this type of activity will usually be disorganized by the time it reaches southeast Michigan," the outlook read.

Opportunities for rain remain frequent, but there's no signal that indicates the area will see more rainfall. That means meteorologists are confident things will be drier than normal.

Summer trivia for southeast Michigan:

The warmest day during the three-month summer period in Metro Detroit was 111 degrees on July 13, 1936, and the coldest was 33 degrees on June 8, 1949.

The wettest month was 9.43 inches of rainfall in August 2012 and the driest was 0.27 inches in August 1927.

cwilliams@detroitnews.com

(313) 222-2311

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