Beaumont victimized by medical equipment thieves, feds say

Robert Snell
The Detroit News
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Detroit — Three men allegedly profited from a black market ring selling used surgical equipment stolen from Beaumont Health, including scopes, instruments for inspecting eyes and ears and other gear, federal prosecutors said.

The case involves stolen equipment sold on eBay and Amazon to buyers across the country, and the three people reaped more than $560,000 through a series of schemes that started in June 2017, according to an indictment unsealed in federal court.

Exterior photo of Beaumont Hospital from the 13 Mile Road entrance. March, 31, 2020, Royal Oak, Mi.

The indictment describes an inside job involving Beaumont employees who sold stolen sponges, adhesives and instruments used to inspect eyes and ears. The equipment included cystoscopes, a thin tube with a camera that is inserted through the urethra and into the bladder.

"Some of the medical devices stolen and re-sold over the Internet were possibly contaminated devices that were previously used in various surgical and other medical procedures on patients," according to the indictment.

The three individuals charged in the indictment are:

  • Paul Purdy, 49, of Bellbrook, Ohio
  • Valdet Seferovic, 32, of Auburn Hills
  • Zafar Khan, 40, of Fenton

Purdy and Seferovic not respond to messages seeking comment Thursday while Harold Gurewitz, a lawyer for Khan, declined comment. The three defendants are scheduled to make initial appearances Jan. 21 in federal court.

“These defendants used their employment status to circumvent the safety protocols established by Beaumont Hospital to profit from the theft of medical devices and put the health and safety of the general public at risk in doing so," U.S. Attorney Matthew Schneider said in a statement.

The wire fraud and conspiracy charges listed in the 18-count indictment are punishable by up to 20 years in federal prison.

Beaumont officials have cooperated fully with the investigation, health system spokesman Mark Geary wrote in an email to The Detroit News.

"This kind of theft does a disservice to more than just Beaumont — it does a disservice to the community," Geary wrote. "We have confidence in the legal process and trust a just result will be achieved."

Purdy and Seferovic were friends who worked at Beaumont and had access to storage areas inside one of the system's hospitals, prosecutors alleged. The duo gained access to medical supplies and devices, according to the government, and devised a plan to steal the equipment and sell the items throughout the U.S.

Purdy, who worked for Beaumont until resigning in 2017, never told buyers the items were stolen, prosecutors said. After he quit, Purdy recruited Seferovic to continue stealing items from the medical supply, cleaning and disinfecting rooms, according to prosecutors.

“Medical devices that are removed from their rightful place in a hospital or other medical setting put patients’ health at risk by denying them access to needed diagnostic imaging and treatment,” Lynda Burdelik, special agent in charge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Criminal Investigations field office in Chicago, said in a statement.

Purdy paid Seferovic for stolen items via PayPal and resold the devices on eBay and Amazon, according to the government. On March 28, 2018, the indictment alleges Purdy received a $4,800 wire payment from the sale of two cystoscopes.

That same day, Seferovic received a $2,550 payment via PayPal, according to the government.

In fall 2017, Seferovic also agreed to steal and sell medical devices and supplies to Khan, who owns Wholesale Medical & Surgical Suppliers of America, LLC in Flint, according to the indictment.

Seferovic would transfer stolen supplies to Khan during meetings in metro Detroit, including at a Walmart parking lot, according to the indictment. Khan, in turn, would sell the supplies and devices online at below retail price.

Seferovic's job duties and status was unclear Thursday.

The investigation and alleged crimes have prompted internal changes at Beaumont.

"...Beaumont has enhanced security protocols and implemented additional checks and balances across the organization to reduce the chances of something like this happening again," Geary said.

rsnell@detroitnews.com

Twitter: @robertsnellnews

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