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How those harmed by Flint water crisis can register for settlement

Craig Mauger
The Detroit News

U.S. District Court Judge Judith Levy's preliminary approval of the $641-million Flint water settlement starts a months-long process through which individuals can register to participate and the final sign-off can be reached.

Those eligible to receive funds through the settlement include people who lived in a home serviced by the Flint water treatment plan and owners of businesses serviced by the plant. People who ingested water from the plant for at least 21 days during any 30-day period after April 25, 2014, and individuals exposed to water from the plant from April 25, 2014, through Dec. 31, 2018, and were diagnosed with Legionnaires’ Disease are also eligible.

A picture down Saginaw St. in Flint, Michigan  on January 14, 2021.

April 25, 2014, is the date Flint switched the source of its drinking water to the Flint River, igniting the contaminated water crisis.

People have until March 29 to register to participate in the settlement. Those who register and are eligible to participate will then have until Aug. 26 to submit the documents necessary to support their claims.

According to Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel's office, detailed information on the registration and the claims processes will be available on the claims administrator website, www.officialflintwatersettlement.com, on Wednesday. The site won't be available until that day because that's when the judge's order takes effect.

"Assuming the court ultimately grants final approval of the settlement, and there are no challenges to that court order, it is estimated that the claims and payment process may be substantially complete before the end of 2021," the Attorney General's office said. "The timeline may change depending on the court’s schedule."

Under the settlement, 80% of the money will go to children who were minors when first exposed to Flint River water after the city switched its drinking water source in 2014. Another 18% of the net funds will be spent on claims from adults and for property damage. And about 1% will go to claims for business losses.

cmauger@detroitnews.com