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Teen in custody over West Bloomfield High threat

James David Dickson, and Mark Hicks
DetroitNews

A 15-year-old is in West Bloomfield police custody in connection with an online bomb threat against the township high school early Wednesday.

Detectives took the teen into custody after 17 hours of investigation, police said in a Wednesday night statement on its Facebook page.

“At this time, our investigation has determined that other than making threats there were no plans against the school or its students,” the post read.

No other information was released about the youth.

West Bloomfield High School, which has about 1,700 students, remained open for classes Wednesday. But the threat prompted a police presence in addition to security guards, district officials said.

The bomb threat came early from a Twitter user named @unnoticed666, and was directed to @wbhslakersports, the Twitter account for West Bloomfield High School principal Pat Watson.

“This is what is going to happen,” @unnoticed666 wrote in one tweet, “the bomb that my uncle and I constructed will go off if you continue this.”

In a previous tweet, that user wrote “I ask for help, and you treat me as an inbred?”

From there, other Twitter users questioned Watson about whether school would be, or should be, in session Wednesday. One user pleaded: “please cancel school. Some students aren’t allowed to stay home and our safety is in danger. We don’t feel comfortable.”

But late in the 5 o’clock hour, Watson responded: “Good morning LakerNation. School will be open today. I will be in the Atrium to answer any and all questions.”

The building had been checked and found secure at 5 a.m., a statement from the district said. School began at 7:10 a.m.

In that statement, superintendent Gerald Hill said that he, Watson, Alesia Flye, deputy superintendent for curriculum and instruction; and human resources director Arthur Ebert “visited every classroom, answering questions from both staff and students.”

“While we witnessed lower than normal attendance, students were actively engaged in learning,” Hill said in the statement.

jdickson@detroitnews.com