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A longtime Farmington Hills police officer who lost his job over child pornography charges has pleaded guilty to downloading the material, the Michigan Attorney General’s Office announced.

Matthew Parsons pleaded guilty Wednesday in Oakland County Circuit Court to three felony charges: possession of child sexually abusive material; using a computer to commit a crime; and recording an unclothed person, authorities said in a statement.

Sentencing is scheduled for Aug. 17 before Judge Nanci Grant. As a part of his plea, Parsons is required to register as a sex offender for 15 years and cannot work as a law enforcement officer in Michigan, according to the Attorney General’s Office.

Parsons, 48, resigned from the Farmington Hills Police Department on June 15.

He was arraigned in May at 51st District Court in Waterford Township on multiple charges stemming from the investigation, which began after a tip from the .

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette’s office learned someone, identified as Parsons, had been downloading child sexually abusive material. A probe revealed Parsons had downloaded at least 10 videos with the explicit imagery and “surreptitiously filmed an adult in the nude,” state officials said.

“While this man did not physically molest a child, he victimized them over and over every time he downloaded and shared child pornography, and as a father both acts are equally heartbreaking,” Schuette said in a statement Thursday. “I consider it to be one of my most important responsibilities to secure justice for Michigan’s most vulnerable.”

The investigation found that none of the acts were committed using city property or while Parsons was on duty. Still, once he was interviewed, the department immediately placed him on paid administrative leave, Farmington Hills Police Chief Chuck Nebus said. The Waterford man later was suspended without pay after the arraignment.

“I want to complement the work done by both Mr. Schuette and the Attorney General’s Office as well as the Michigan Crimes and Internet Task Force on this case,” Nebus said Thursday. “I am grateful for their assistance bringing this case to a conclusion.”

Parsons worked for the patrol division and had a 25-year history with the department, Nebus has said. Before spending two decades as a sworn officer, he was a volunteer reserve officer and a cadet.

In April 1999, The Detroit News reported, Parsons saved a senior citizen’s life by performing CPR on her until paramedics arrived. The Farmington Hills Optimist Club honored him in 2000 with the Police Officer of the Year Award.

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