Pontiac Silverdome demolition could start this summer

Mark Hicks
The Detroit News

The Pontiac Silverdome could face a wrecking ball in the next six weeks, city officials confirmed Friday.

The field at the Pontiac Silverdome flooded in May 2014.

As part of a consent agreement an Oakland County judge signed in March, owners of the long-empty site’s had to have selected a contractor by May 12, and that firm had until Friday to submit a permit application and demolition start date.

Triple Investment Group LLC, which has owned the property since 2009, last month retained Detroit-based Adamo Group as the contractor. A demolition permit was provided to Pontiac Thursday along with permit fees and performance bonds, said J. Travis Mihelick, an attorney for the city.

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“Because of the significant size of the project, the city and the owner are in the process of finalizing the scope of work that is part of the application, which I anticipate to be completed shortly,” he told The Detroit News on Friday. “The owner is in the process of finalizing the utility disconnects, which we are hopeful will be completed in the next few weeks. The parties are optimistic of potentially having a mid-July start date.”

J. Patrick Lennon, an attorney for the owners, said they hope details are settled early next week. Once final, more specific estimates on the start date and timeline for the project will be available, he said.

“Triple Investment Group continues to be committed to starting, and completing, the demolition process as quickly as they can,” he said.

Triple Investment Group bought the parcel for $583,000 and sought to sell it for $30 million. After that failed, officials in 2015 announced demolition plans, possibly to spur development.

Richard Adamo, president of Adamo Group, said demolition is expected to start in the next 45 days."

The demolition start signals another step in erasing the legendary Silverdome, which opened in 1975 at a cost to taxpayers of $55.7 million.

The stadium near M-59 and Interstate 75 was a destination for concerts and the former home of the Detriot Lions and Pistons.

Fortunes faded once the Lions departed for Detroit’s Ford Field in 2002. The nearly 130-acre site eventually became an eyesore — losing its inflatable dome after a snowstorm and essentially functioning as the world’s largest bird bath, the city mayor told state lawmakers this year.

In 2009, as Pontiac worked to drop its expense holdings amid a dire financial situation, state-appointed emergency manager Fred Leeb auctioned the site, which cost about $1.5 million to maintain each year.

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Triple Investment Group bought the parcel for $583,000 and sought to sell it for $30 million. After that failed, officials in 2015 announced demolition plans, possibly to spur development.

Meanwhile, the city filed a nuisance abatement in February, alleging building, safety and zoning codes violations after part of the parking lot was used to store Volkswagen cars during the automaker’s U.S. emissions scandal. That launched negotiations between the investment group and Pontiac, which led to setting demolition terms in the consent agreement.

At that time, Andreas Apostolopoulos, CEO of Triple Investment Group, said new development opportunities were possible at the site.

The Silverdome was home for the Detroit Lions from 1975-2001.