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. — The strange journey of three suburban Denver girls who authorities say tried to join Islamic State militants in Syria has many in their close-knit east African community worried about whether their own children will be the next to be lured to terror.

The girls’ voyage has mystified many in the U.S., and has been even more troubling among Aurora’s Somali and Sudanese immigrants, thousands of whom fled civil war and forged new lives in the Denver suburbs, where refugees easily find jobs driving cabs or working in the meat industry.

But while the girls’ parents were working to give them a better life, being a Muslim teenager isn’t easy in an American high school, said Ahmed Odowaay, a community advocate who works with youth. It’s easy to feel like an outsider, even as a U.S. citizen.

Even his 10-year-old daughter gets taunts of “terrorist” when she wears her hijab in school, he said.

“This community is outcast. They feel like they don’t belong here. They’re frustrated,” Odowaay said from his seat at Barwaaqo, a restaurant hidden in one of Aurora’s low-slung strip malls, where other men dined on goat and spaghetti, a favorite east African dish. “I’m worried their frustrations will lead them in the wrong direction.”

Young people in communities like this across the country are vulnerable to extremists in Syria and elsewhere who reach out to them online, promising the glory of battle, the honor becoming a wife, or just acceptance. Odowaay said it’s easy for young Muslims to encounter recruiters while trolling Facebook. He said it’s happened to him.

Family and friends saw the three — two Somali sisters ages 17 and 15 and their 16-year-old Sudanese friend — as typical Muslim teenagers who like the mall and movies, not fundamentalists.

It wasn’t until they missed class that the 16-year-old’s father realized they had been talking online to militants, who convinced them to steal cash from their parents, buy plane tickets and head to Syria with their U.S. passports.

The girls likely won’t be charged with a crime and are safe now, but the father said he is still troubled by lingering questions about their intentions and who recruited them online. .

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