The Four Seasons closes

Associated Press

New York — It’s the end of an era. The Four Seasons restaurant, where the New York City power lunch was born, is closing.

In this July 12, 2016 photo, a sculpture by Richard Lippold hangs from the ceiling above the Front Bar at The Four Seasons restaurant, where the power lunch was born, in New York's landmarked Seagram building, home to the restaurant for 57 years. The epitome of the midcentury style in Midtown Manhattan, The Four Seasons is scheduled to close on Saturday, July 16.

After serving a “must see” crowd of business executive and celebrities for 57 years, the Philip Johnson-designed restaurant served its last meals Saturday.

Housed in the Seagram Building on Park Avenue, its regulars included Henry Kissinger, Nora Ephron and Tom Wolfe.

In recent days, selfies posted online captured some patrons and staff splashing in the pool that graced the center of the dining room.

A new Four Seasons will open nearby following 18 months of renovation.

The Pool Room of The Four Seasons restaurant is set for lunch service, in New York's landmarked Seagram building, which has housed the restaurant for 57 years. Designed by the legendary architect Philip Johnson and the building's architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, the restaurant was a favorite of celebrities and business titans ever since it opened in 1959, and legend has it that Sophia Loren was the first guest to jump in the pool. The Four Seasons is scheduled to close on Saturday, July 16.

But those nostalgic for the original Four Season have a chance to buy a piece of it. Some of its furnishings, including flatware and barstools, go on the auction block July 26.