Campaign snapshots: Trump blames media for tweet uproar

Donald Trump is blaming the press for the fuss over an anti-Hillary Clinton tweet that appeared to depict the Star of David atop a pile of cash.

It was his first response to the matter since his official account tweeted— then deleted — the image Saturday in the face of an uproar over its potentially anti-Semitic connotations. Trump’s account later posted a new version with a circle in place of the six-point star.

“Dishonest media is trying their absolute best to depict a star in a tweet as the Star of David rather than a Sheriff’s Star, or plain star!” Trump tweeted Monday.

It remains unclear where the campaign found the image, but it previously appeared on a white supremacist message board filled with anti-Semitic messages as well as the Twitter feed of a self-identified comedian who tweeted out provocative and offensive images.

Sarah Bard, Clinton’s director of Jewish outreach, said in a statement Monday that “Trump’s use of a blatantly anti-Semitic image from racist websites to promote his campaign” was part of a pattern. “Now, not only won’t he apologize for it, he’s peddling lies and blaming others,” she added. “Trump should be condemning hate, not offering more campaign behavior and rhetoric that engages extremists.”

Iowa senator meets Trump amid VP hunt

If Donald Trump and Iowa Sen. Joni Ernst discussed making her his running mate in a weekend meeting, mum’s the word.

The senator released a statement afterward saying they had a good talk and discussed concerns she’s hearing from Iowans about the direction of the country as she tours her state. Neither Ernst nor Trump mentioned his vice presidential search publicly.

The presumptive Republican nominee also spent time over the weekend with Indiana Gov. Mike Pence. He’s considered another running-mate prospect.

Clinton, Obama to start new relationship phase

President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton will show off a new phase in their relationship: co-dependents. The two plan to campaign together for the first time on Tuesday in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Clinton’s chances of winning the White House hinge on rallying Obama’s coalition to her cause. Obama’s legacy depends on her success. They now plan to spend four months selling each other to the public.

From Detroit News wire services