Washington — A court ruled Thursday that an internet hosting company must turn over records for a website that the government alleges was used to plan violent protests on the day of President Donald Trump’s inauguration.

Defense lawyers warned that the ruling by the District of Columbia Superior Court could have a chilling effect on electronic political activism and freedom of expression.

Judge Robert Morin ordered DreamHost to provide the Justice Department with records for a website called from October 2016, when the site debuted, to January 2017. Prosecutors allege the site was used to organize anti-Trump protests on Jan. 20, when more than 200 people were arrested after protesters broke windows and set fire to a limousine.

Government lawyers originally obtained a search warrant for the site’s records last month. But DreamHost challenged the request as overly broad and infringing on the rights of free speech and political expression for the site’s approximately 1.3 million visitors.

In response to those concerns, the Justice Department presented a scaled-down request to the court earlier this week, specifying that it was only seeking evidence of violent or criminal activity being planned for the inauguration.

Judge Morin, in approving the government’s request, specified that the government’s process of sifting and vetting the raw information would be closely monitored and he would personally supervise what he called the “minimization program” to ensure that information outside the scope of the government’s request was protected and sealed.

DreamHost’s representatives said those court-ordered safeguards probably wouldn’t assuage the fears of those who visited the website.

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