Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene tries to laugh off gazpacho Gestapo mix-up

Dave Goldiner
New York Daily News

At least Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) can poke fun of herself for mixing up the Nazi secret police with a chilled Spanish soup.

The right-wing firebrand laughed off comments made during an interview with One American Network (OAN) complaining House Speaker Pelosi was secretly investigating members of Congress and constituents.

“Not only do we have the D.C. jail, which is the D.C. gulag,” said Rep. Greene in a now-viral video. “Now we have Nancy Pelosi’s gazpacho police spying on members of Congress, spying on the legislative work that we do, spying on our staff and spying on American citizens that want to come to talk with their representatives.”

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., warns of "Nancy Pelosi's gazpacho police," during an interview with One American Network (OAN).

After being roundly mocked for confusing the Gestapo, the official secret police of Nazi Germany and in German-occupied Europe with gazpacho, a cold tomato soup often served with cucumbers and cilantro, Greene surfaced on social media on Thursday morning.

“No soup for those who illegally spy on Members of Congress, but they will be thrown in the goulash. #Gazpacho #Gestapo,” said Greene.

But the damage was done.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), leader of the progressive Squad in Congress, said the screw-up shows Greene, who also favors banning books that expose racial injustice, needs to go back to school.

“She clearly banned all books from her house years ago,” AOC tweeted.

Rep. Grace Meng (D-N.Y.) was more pointed with her reaction after watching the video.

“To every little girl out there: don’t ever think you’re not smart enough to run for office,” wrote Meng.

Even though Greene laughed off her own verbal slip-up, this is not her first flawed reference comparing American politics to Nazis and the Holocaust.

Last year, the conservative agitator was forced to apologize for affronting people with recent comments comparing the required wearing of safety masks in the House to the horrors of the Holocaust.

“I’m truly sorry for offending people with remarks about the Holocaust,” the Georgia Republican told reporters outside the Capitol, saying she had visited Washington’s U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum earlier in the day. “There’s no comparison and there never ever will be.”