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Snapshots: Trump camp tries to rally before convention

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks in New York, Wednesday, June 22, 2016.

Washington — Republicans are sprinting to shape up Donald Trump’s presidential campaign before the party’s national convention in three weeks, even as leading members of the party carry a deep antipathy or outright opposition to his claim on the GOP nomination.

His campaign chairman said Sunday there’s a hiring spree in 16 states and the campaign is working with the Republican National Committee to solidify other matters.

Paul Manafort said Trump is not all that involved in the race to organize an offensive against Democrat Hillary Clinton and catch up to her massive fundraising advantage.

“The good thing is we have a candidate who doesn’t need to figure out what’s going on (inside the campaign ) in order to say what he wants to do,” Manafort said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “We have our campaign plans in place. We have our budgets in place.”

shape up Donald Trump’s presidential campaign before the party’s national convention in three weeks, even as leading members of the party carry a deep antipathy or outright opposition to his claim on the GOP nomination.

His campaign chairman said Sunday there’s a hiring spree in 16 states and the campaign is working with the Republican National Committee to solidify other matters.

Paul Manafort said Trump is not all that involved in the race to organize an offensive against Democrat Hillary Clinton and catch up to her massive fundraising advantage.

“The good thing is we have a candidate who doesn’t need to figure out what’s going on (inside the campaign ) in order to say what he wants to do,” Manafort said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “We have our campaign plans in place. We have our budgets in place.”

Clinton hammers Trump’s Brexit response in new ad

Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, released a new national television ad on Sunday attacking likely Republican rival Donald Trump for his comments on the U.K’s decisionto leave the European Union.

The ad, which will begin airing this week, comes as the two spar over the meaning of the Brexit vote and seek to portray it as as an argument bolstering their candidacies in the U.S.

The campaign of the former secretary of state, who had urged the U.K. not to leave,slammed the real estate investor for saying on Friday that his golf courses in Scotland would benefit from market turmoil that followed the vote, including an 8-percent decline in the British pound to the lowest level since 1985.

Trump has insisted that the combination of economic stagnation, anger at trade policies, and distrust of immigrants that helped propel the Brexit vote represents the same momentum that carried him to the Republican nomination and shows that Clinton is out of step with voters.

“Every president is tested by world events, but Donald Trump thinks about how his golf resort can profit from them,” says Clinton’s ad, which juxtaposes Trump’s praise of the course with news reports of plummeting stock markets. “In a volatile world, the last thing we need is a volatile president.”

From Detroit News wire services