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Presidential convention snapshots

Trump takes on

U.S. trade deals

Republican Donald Trump took aim at U.S. free trade deals in a speech delivered in Western Pennsylvania Tuesday that painted his likely Democratic rival Hillary Clinton as a champion of the kind of globalization that has pushed manufacturing jobs overseas.

“This wave of globalization has wiped out totally, totally our middle class,” said Trump. “It doesn’t have to be this way. We can turn it around and we can turn it around fast.”

The speech, delivered in the heart of America’s struggling rust belt, stressed a central premise of his campaign: that global free trade has hurt American workers because deals have been negotiated poorly. Trump has vowed to bring back manufacturing jobs, in part, by slapping tariffs on goods produced by companies that move manufacturing jobs offshore.

Trump, in his speech, portrayed Clinton as an agent of a status quo “that worships globalism over Americanism” and criticized her past support for the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which he described as “the deathblow for American manufacturing.”

Clinton’s positon on trade has been a frequent attack line for Trump. Clinton announced her opposition to the Pacific trade deal last October, saying it failed to meet her test of providing good jobs, rising wages and protecting national security.

Debt pardon offered young entrepreneurs

Hillary Clinton on Tuesday proposed letting entrepreneurs defer making student loan payments in order to create jobs and stimulate growth.

“We need more job creators and we need more young people starting businesses,” the presumptive Democratic nominee told a crowd of coders inside a Denver tech incubator that houses several start-ups. She was on a brief campaign swing through the battleground state of Colorado.

Clinton proposed permitting start-up founders and early employees to forgo payments on their federal student loans for up to three years. Those who launch businesses that provide social benefits would also be permitted to apply for forgiveness of up to $17,500 of their debt after five years.

Clinton also called for connecting every household to high-speed internet by 2020 and training 50,000 new computer science teachers.

From Detroit News

wire services