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Since the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh as the newest Supreme Court Associate Justice, the left has demonstrated the consequences should we continue to pursue politics and not cave to emotion-fueled protests. A Republican senator’s wife received a video of a beheading on her cell phone. A Minnesota elementary school teacher took her rage to Twitter, where she asked, “So whose [sic] gonna take one for the team and kill Kavanaugh?”

Photographs of Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, superimposed with the words “Rape Apologist” have been circulated around the internet following her decision to vote to confirm Justice Kavanaugh, which Collins explained in a fact-filled 40-minute address on the Senate floor.

The demonization of the right, of course, is nothing new. With midterm elections looming, the attacks go further. Borrowing from the playbook of Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., who made outlandish calls for “push back” on members of Trump’s cabinet wherever they were found in public, the co-chair of the Women’s March urged women to “turn up on [family],” and not to “allow people to be comfortable around you” if they intend to vote for “racists and bigots.”

Some friends and members of my own family must have received an advance copy of this directive. In the past two years, several have rubbed my face in my conservatism as if it is something of which I should be ashamed.

After it was revealed that 52 percent of white women broke with our uteruses to vote with our principles in November 2016, we as a demographic have been a target of growing disdain.

According to the master narrative touted by the left, white, or, rather, conservative women come in two varieties: the gun-totin’, bible-thumpin’ racists who can’t think a lick for themselves, and the rich women spending their days watching HGTV and hoping that their husbands will return soon to tell them what to think.

The left tries to stuff us into these identity politics cubby holes, but not a single conservative woman I know fits these molds.

Something many of my conservative female friends have in common is that they keep quiet about politics to avoid being ostracized by those who are manipulating the conversation even while claiming they are being silenced. When I spoke up about my political choices, I was dragged through the mud, and accused of gaslighting those who disagree with me.

I will not be shushed, shamed and stereotyped. I am sick of the fallacy that, because the suffragettes fought for my right to vote, I must always vote for candidates who share my gender.

My conservative friends and I are smart, strong and savvy. We believe in liberty and the Constitution, and in harnessing the powers of individuals rather than enabling the unchecked growth of the state.

We may not be screaming in the streets, as we are dealing with deadlines, mortgages, child rearing, and volunteering gigs, but I can promise you that my friends and I have been paying attention to every move the left has made in the past two years. Trust me when I tell you, conservative women keep receipts.

Beth Bailey is a Pinckney-based freelance writer.

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