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Denver — Nolan Arenado likes where he’s at and the direction the Colorado Rockies are headed.

So he’s staying put. For possibly a long, long time. And for a chance to finish what this team has been brewing.

Arenando, an All-Star third baseman, agreed to a $260 million, eight-year contract on Tuesday, a person familiar with the negotiations told the Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the deal has not been finalized.

Arenado’s agreement includes a provision that allows him to opt out after three years and become a free agent.

If the deal is finalized, Arenado’s $32.5 million average annual value would be the second-highest in baseball history behind the $34.42 million for pitcher Zack Greinke in a $206.5 million contract with Arizona that began in 2016.

Arenado’s deal would replace a $26 million, one-year contract he agreed to Jan. 31.

Arenado, who turns 28 on April 16, was on track to be eligible for free agency after this season. But there’s comfort in remaining at Coors Field, especially in these uncertain days of free agency that have seen Manny Machado unsigned until last week and Bryce Harper still searching for a team with exhibition games underway.

That hasn’t been lost on Arenado, who recently said: “There are some really good baseball players out there, and it is crazy to think some of these teams don’t need them. They need them.”

Tanaka: No pitch clock

Yankees right-hander Masahiro Tanaka, among the most unhurried starters in the major leagues, does not support a 20-second pitch clock.

“As players, we have to go by the rules so we do that,” Tanaka said through a translator Tuesday. “With that said, for me personally, I’m not in favor of that.”

Tanaka was ranked 76th out of 78 pitchers throwing 150 or more innings last year at 26.1 seconds between pitches, according to Fangraphs.

He was ahead of only two former Tigers: Houston’s Justin Verlander (26.3) and Boston’s David Price (26.7).

Cardinals sign Mikolas

The Cardinals opening-day starter, right-hander Miles Mikolas, agreed to deal to stay in St. Louis.

St. Louis and Mikolas agreed to a $68 million, four-year contract covering 2020-23, a deal announced Tuesday that raises his pay to $75.5 million over the next five seasons.

Angels’ Knoop retires

Longtime Angels player and coach Bobby Knoop has announced his retirement after 53 years in baseball.

The 80-year-old Knoop earned the club’s MVP award four times in its inaugural decade.

 

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