Friday's Big Ten: No. 5 Iowa forces 7 turnovers in 51-14 rout of Maryland

Nolan Bianchi
The Detroit News

College Park, Md. — Spencer Petras threw for three touchdowns and ran for two and No. 5 Iowa took advantage of seven Maryland turnovers in a 51-14 victory Friday night.

The Hawkeyes (5-0, 2-0 Big Ten) intercepted five of Taulia Tagovailoa's passes, and they outscored the Terrapins 31-0 in the second quarter as Maryland completely unraveled. The Terps (4-1, 1-1) never recovered after losing standout receiver Dontay Demus to an apparent leg injury on a kickoff return early in the second.

Iowa wide receiver Tyrone Tracy Jr. reacts after scoring a touchdown against Maryland during the second half of an NCAA college football game, Friday, Oct. 1, 2021, in College Park, Md.

Iowa beat Iowa State earlier this season thanks to a plus-four turnover margin on a day the Hawkeyes were badly outgained. The matchup with Maryland was an even more extreme version of that. The Terrapins turned the ball over five times in the first half and four times in the second quarter.

“You sit on the bench for two seconds, you're right back out,” Petras said, describing the flurry of takeaways.

Tagovailoa had thrown only one interception all season — while leading the Big Ten in yards passing — but he was picked off on the Terrapins' second possession Friday in a sign of things to come. That turnover led to a field goal that opened the scoring, but Maryland responded sharply, driving 69 yards in eight plays and taking the lead on a 9-yard scoring pass from Tagovailoa to Chigoziem Okonkwo.

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Iowa went ahead 10-7 on a 1-yard run by Petras on the first play of the second quarter, and then Maryland's big night — the Terps had a chance to start 5-0 for the first time since 2001 — went sour for good.

Demus, the Big Ten's leader in yards receiving, had four catches for 61 yards in the first quarter. On the kickoff after Petras' touchdown, however, he fumbled and remained on the ground injured. He eventually left on a cart, and that turnover gave Iowa the ball at the Maryland 10.

“We took an X-ray of it,” Maryland coach Michael Locksley said. “Until we get the MRI, we’re not really sure, but it’s some type of lower-body injury.”

Petras threw an 8-yard TD pass to Arland Bruce IV. Then, on the first play of the Terps' next possession, Tagovailoa's deflected pass was intercepted, and the Hawkeyes took over at the Maryland 26.

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Petras made it 24-7 with a 1-yard scoring run. Then Tagovailoa's next pass was picked off at the Maryland 45. Iowa scored again on Monte Pottebaum's 2-yard run.

The final turnover of the half came on a Hail Mary by Tagovailoa on the last play. After two more interceptions in the second half — one thrown by Tagovailoa and one by his backup — Iowa now has 12 on the season. No other Big Ten team has more than five.

In the second half, Petras threw touchdown passes of 67 yards to Tyler Goodson and 7 yards to Tyrone Tracy.

Wisconsin to name Camp Randall Stadium's field after Alvarez

Wisconsin is naming the playing field at Camp Randall Stadium after former Badgers football coach and athletic director Barry Alvarez.

Chancellor Rebecca Blank announced the decision at a Friday night ceremony honoring Alvarez, who retired as Wisconsin’s athletic director this summer. Blank said the playing field will be known as “Barry Alvarez Field at Camp Randall Stadium.”

He coached Wisconsin from 1990-2005 and set a program record for career coaching victories, winning three Rose Bowl titles at a program that had gone 9-36 in the four years before his arrival. His 119-74-4 career record includes a 1-1 mark as an interim coach in bowl games that capped the 2012 and 2014 seasons.

Alvarez was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2010.

“Barry Alvarez has had an immeasurable impact on the UW-Madison campus, beyond in the state and in college sports,” Blank said. “And that type of career deserves recognition at the very highest level.

Blank said a fundraising campaign had brought in over $13 million in conjunction with this project.

The naming of the field will take effect next season. School officials plan to put the words “Barry Alvarez Field” in the northwest and southwest corners of the field when the Camp Randall Stadium turf is replaced prior to the 2022 season.

“That was quite a surprise,” Alvarez said. “I’m touched. I’m honored.”

Alvarez took over as Wisconsin’s athletic director in 2004 while he was still coaching the Badgers. Wisconsin teams won 16 national titles in six different sports (women’s lightweight rowing, men’s cross country, men’s hockey, women’s hockey, men’s indoor track and men’s rowing) during his run as athletic director. Women’s lightweight rowing is a sport whose championships aren’t sanctioned by the NCAA.