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Foxborough, Mass. — The NFL said Friday it has interviewed dozens of people and collected physical evidence but has no conclusions yet on how the Patriots used underinflated balls in their last game, offering no timetable for resolving the cheating accusations with the Super Bowl nine days away.

The league said Friday evidence shows the Patriots used underinflated footballs during the first half of the AFC championship game Sunday night against the Indianapolis Colts.

It issued a statement the Patriots have pledged full cooperation and have given the league information it requested and made personnel available upon request.

Patriots quarterback Tom Brady said Thursday afternoon he had not been contacted at that point.

The NFL said it began its investigation Sunday night and expects cooperation from other clubs. It hired an investigatory company to help review electronic and video information.

Patriots owner Robert Kraft said investigators were in Foxborough for three days this week after he received a letter from the league Monday informing him of the probe.

"We provided access to every full- and part-time employee the league's representatives requested to speak with and produced every communication device that they requested to search," he said. "I very much support the league's desire to conduct a complete investigation."

The Patriots are preparing to meet the defending champion Seahawks in the Super Bowl on Feb. 1 in Glendale, Arizona.

The league said its conclusions will be quickly shared when reached.

"Over the past several days, nearly 40 interviews have been conducted, including of Patriots personnel, game officials, and third parties with relevant information and expertise," the statement said.

NFL executive vice president Jeff Pash and Ted Wells of the law firm of Paul Weiss are leading the probe.

Colts general manager Ryan Grigson declined to comment.

"Everything, I'm sure is going to come out in the investigation," he said when asked if the Colts alerted the NFL to the underinflated balls.

"It's in the league's hands."

A former NFL ball boy said it's easy to remove air from a ball discreetly with a small pin that fits in the palm of a hand.

"This isn't a big deal. Everyone does it because each quarterback likes a different grip," Nader Kawash, an Eagles ball boy from 1996-2000, told The AP.

Extra points

The Ravens intend to cut ties with defensive tackle Terrence Cody, who's under investigation for animal cruelty, after the Super Bowl.

A Baltimore County police official says no charges have been filed, and that the investigation is ongoing.

... The Allegheny County Sheriff says there is no proof of misconduct by a deputy who moonlights as the chief of security for the Steelers.

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