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Allen Park — If Glover Quin had his way, he wouldn't have played for the Detroit Lions in 2018.

In his first comments since his release, the veteran safety explained his mindset from the past offseason to "The Pride Podcast." 

"I really don’t want to have to start over, again, in another different direction in Detroit," Quin said. "I kind of felt like I’ve done what I can do, they’re going to start with a new coach, let them start fresh with another player and let me go.

"I actually tried to get out of my contract going into the season. I knew it was going to get to this point. I knew it was going to happen. I understand the business of football. ... I was just trying to stop it before it even got it started."

Quin said he never expected Detroit to let him out of the two-year extension he had signed the previous year, but he owed it to himself to ask. His hope was to catch on with a team closer to his family in Houston, possibly even a second stint with the Texans. 

"My family lives in Houston and I was really missing being around my family," he said. "If I’m going to have to start over with a new coach anyway, let me see if I can re-sign in Houston. Yeah, I’ll have to start over with a new coach and everything, but at least I get to come home every day and see my wife and see my kids."

Quin also said the lack of recognition he received for his 2017 season, one of his best, took a toll on him. After forcing seven turnovers and falling just short of his career-high in tackles, Quin received glowing marks from analytics site Pro Football Focus, but was only named a fourth alternate for the Pro Bowl, behind the likes of Kam Chancellor, who had been limited to nine games due to injury. 

It was too much for Quin, who found the entire process disrespectful. When the league eventually called to invite him to participate as a replacement in the annual all-star game, he declined. 

That combined with a coaching and scheme changes in Detroit, took a lot out of him. 

"Did I really want to go through all that? It just wasn’t good," Quin said. "I tried to fight through it, come back and play. Dealing with the new coaches, didn’t go the offseason program, I needed a break. I needed time to get myself back together."

Skipping the voluntary portions of the offseason program put Quin behind learning the new scheme and he was never able to recover. He finished last season with a career-low three pass breakups and didn't record an interception for the first time in seven seasons.

The Lions released Quin last Friday, a move he expected, and one that cleared more than $6 million in cap space for the franchise. The veteran was appreciative the team made the decision early, giving him ample time to consider his future in football. 

As for retirement, that decision hasn't been made. The 33-year-old safety is open to listening to offers, and if there's one that makes sense for both him and his family, he's willing to continuing his career. 

jdrogers@detroitnews.com

Twitter: @Justin_Rogers

 

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